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  • ...le you would expect: shaking buildings, fleeing people, fires, all elements familiar from any number of disaster <strong>film</strong>s, rendered here with impressive technical skill.  But Feng approaches this in a very interesting way, basically dispensing with all of this in the first twenty minutes or so, and spends the rest of the <strong>film</strong> detailing how this earthquake affects the fortunes of a single family.  As the title indicates, “Aftershock”is less about the...

    The best films of the 2010 Pusan International Film Festival

    Christopher Bourne ...le you would expect: shaking buildings, fleeing people, fires, all elements familiar from any number of disaster films, rendered here with impressive technical skill.  But Feng approaches this in a very interesting way, basically dispensing with all of this in the first twenty minutes or so, and spends the rest of the film detailing how this earthquake affects the fortunes of a single family.  As the title indicates, “Aftershock”is less about the...

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  • One of the strongest selections of the 2009 Tribeca <strong>Film</strong> Festival, “About <strong>Elly</strong>” is a psychologically penetrating <strong>film</strong> in which a woman’s disappearance gives rise to all sorts of complex issues of morality (both within an Iranian context and without), and questions of culpability and responsibility for tragedy. The <strong>film</strong> subtly switches from an observational and lightly comic portrait of Iranian middle-class life to a much darker moral...

    Asghar Farhadi’s “About Elly” – 2009 Tribeca Film Festival Review

    Christopher Bourne One of the strongest selections of the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival, “About Elly” is a psychologically penetrating film in which a woman’s disappearance gives rise to all sorts of complex issues of morality (both within an Iranian context and without), and questions of culpability and responsibility for tragedy. The film subtly switches from an observational and lightly comic portrait of Iranian middle-class life to a much darker moral...

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  • ...igitization of <strong>film</strong> is why Panh, winner of the Asian <strong>Film</strong>maker of the Year Award at the 2013 Busan International <strong>Film</strong> Festival, considers the future as equally important as the past.  The 49-year-old director co-founded the Bophana Audiovisual Resource Center in Phnom Penh where students – unable to benefit from the lost generation of artists that perished during the Khmer Rouge era – learn about archiving, preservation, <strong>film</strong>making and other area...

    A Rithy Panh interview: “The Missing Picture” and Cambodian cinema

    Yuan-Kwan Chan ...igitization of film is why Panh, winner of the Asian Filmmaker of the Year Award at the 2013 Busan International Film Festival, considers the future as equally important as the past.  The 49-year-old director co-founded the Bophana Audiovisual Resource Center in Phnom Penh where students – unable to benefit from the lost generation of artists that perished during the Khmer Rouge era – learn about archiving, preservation, filmmaking and other area...

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  • ...n that he has searched for Anh in particular. Meniscus Magazine talked to Nguyen at the 2013 Busan International <strong>Film</strong> Festival, where “Once Upon a Time in Vietnam” made its international premiere.  He talked about what it was like to direct and act at the same time, the reality of <strong>film</strong>ing in Vietnam versus Hollywood, and how he convinced his parents to become involved in his career. Yuan-Kwan Chan: Thank you for taking the time to chat with me. D...

    A Dustin Nguyen interview: Transforming Vietnamese film

    Yuan-Kwan Chan ...n that he has searched for Anh in particular. Meniscus Magazine talked to Nguyen at the 2013 Busan International Film Festival, where “Once Upon a Time in Vietnam” made its international premiere.  He talked about what it was like to direct and act at the same time, the reality of filming in Vietnam versus Hollywood, and how he convinced his parents to become involved in his career. Yuan-Kwan Chan: Thank you for taking the time to chat with me. D...

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  • Editor’s note: “Closed Curtain” screens at the <strong>Film</strong> Forum in New York for two weeks, beginning Wed., July 9, 2014.  For more information, go to http://<strong>film</strong>forum.org/<strong>film</strong>/closed-curtain. In “This Is Not a <strong>Film</strong>,” Jafar Panahi’s 2011 semi-documentary feature, which he made shortly after a 20-year ban from <strong>film</strong>making was imposed on him for supposed subversive anti-government activities, Panahi describes and maps out in detail an id...

    “Closed Curtain” – 2013 San Diego Asian Film Festival Review

    Christopher Bourne Editor’s note: “Closed Curtain” screens at the Film Forum in New York for two weeks, beginning Wed., July 9, 2014.  For more information, go to http://filmforum.org/film/closed-curtain. In “This Is Not a Film,” Jafar Panahi’s 2011 semi-documentary feature, which he made shortly after a 20-year ban from filmmaking was imposed on him for supposed subversive anti-government activities, Panahi describes and maps out in detail an id...

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  • ...chool gives you the opportunity to teach. Any awards or grants? Just a small one from the Seattle Asian American <strong>Film</strong> Festival-Best NW <strong>film</strong>. My friend joked that I can call myself an award winning <strong>film</strong>maker. A full color article about me in Seattle Magazine May 1997. A one man retrospective at 911 Media Arts Center, May 1997.  Tell me your <strong>film</strong>ography in chronological order. The years that the <strong>film</strong>s were made — not necessarily the year they...

    The World of Doug Ing

    I.H. Kuniyuki ...chool gives you the opportunity to teach. Any awards or grants? Just a small one from the Seattle Asian American Film Festival-Best NW film. My friend joked that I can call myself an award winning filmmaker. A full color article about me in Seattle Magazine May 1997. A one man retrospective at 911 Media Arts Center, May 1997. Tell me your filmography in chronological order. The years that the films were made — not necessarily the year they...

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  • “Recession? What recession?” This was the message of the 2009 Pusan International <strong>Film</strong> Festival (PIFF) in South Korea, which bucked the current trend of other festivals that have felt compelled to cut back and offer fewer amenities to journalists (Tribeca, I’m talking to you). This year, PIFF unveiled its biggest slate ever: 355 <strong>film</strong>s from 70 countries, sprawled out in two far-apart areas of Busan – Haeundae and downtown Nampo-dong. This was my...

    My recap of the 14th Pusan International Film Festival

    Christopher Bourne “Recession? What recession?” This was the message of the 2009 Pusan International Film Festival (PIFF) in South Korea, which bucked the current trend of other festivals that have felt compelled to cut back and offer fewer amenities to journalists (Tribeca, I’m talking to you). This year, PIFF unveiled its biggest slate ever: 355 films from 70 countries, sprawled out in two far-apart areas of Busan – Haeundae and downtown Nampo-dong. This was my...

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  • The 2008 Pusan International <strong>Film</strong> Festival revisited two of Kim Ki-young’s <strong>film</strong>s as part of its “Archeology of Korean Cinema” retrospective. One of these was Kim’s undoubtedly most famous work, “The Housemaid,” which screened in a new digital restoration that premiered at the 2008 Cannes <strong>Film</strong> Festival. One of the enduring classics of Korean cinema, Kim’s 1960 expressionist masterpiece was first rediscovered, along with his other works, at the 2n...

    Kim Ki-young’s “The Housemaid” ( 하녀 ) – 2008 Pusan International Film Festival Review

    Christopher Bourne The 2008 Pusan International Film Festival revisited two of Kim Ki-young’s films as part of its “Archeology of Korean Cinema” retrospective. One of these was Kim’s undoubtedly most famous work, “The Housemaid,” which screened in a new digital restoration that premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. One of the enduring classics of Korean cinema, Kim’s 1960 expressionist masterpiece was first rediscovered, along with his other works, at the 2n...

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  • Naomi Kawase directed her first short <strong>film</strong> in 1988 while studying at the Osaka School of Photography (now the Osaka School of Visual Arts), where she received her initial training as a <strong>film</strong>maker. The title, “I Focus on That Which Interests Me,” could describe the aim of any <strong>film</strong>maker who strives to create works with a personal vision and voice. But the fact that Kawase gave her <strong>film</strong> such a direct and rather bold title says quite a bit, perhaps,...

    An interview with Naomi Kawase, director of “The Mourning Forest”

    Christopher Bourne Naomi Kawase directed her first short film in 1988 while studying at the Osaka School of Photography (now the Osaka School of Visual Arts), where she received her initial training as a filmmaker. The title, “I Focus on That Which Interests Me,” could describe the aim of any filmmaker who strives to create works with a personal vision and voice. But the fact that Kawase gave her film such a direct and rather bold title says quite a bit, perhaps,...

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  • The most frustrating thing about attending a festival with 355 selections is that it is impossible to see more than a tiny fraction of them. My press pass allowed me a maximum of four <strong>film</strong>s a day, which is pretty much the limit one can maintain and still allow yourself reasonable rest and time to do other things, not to mention retaining your sanity. So putting together any kind of list of the best <strong>film</strong>s of the Pusan International <strong>Film</strong> Festival...

    From a packed Pusan lineup, a Top 10 film list emerges

    Christopher Bourne The most frustrating thing about attending a festival with 355 selections is that it is impossible to see more than a tiny fraction of them. My press pass allowed me a maximum of four films a day, which is pretty much the limit one can maintain and still allow yourself reasonable rest and time to do other things, not to mention retaining your sanity. So putting together any kind of list of the best films of the Pusan International Film Festival...

    Continue Reading...

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