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  • etail<strong>s</strong> of the natural world, a<strong>s</strong> well a<strong>s</strong> a vivid <strong>s</strong>ense of Nara a<strong>s</strong> a place (you could practically draw a map of Nara based on her film<strong>s</strong>), that <strong>s</strong>he bring<strong>s s</strong>o forcefully to her documentarie<strong>s</strong>. <strong>Kawase</strong>’<strong>s</strong> most recent documentary, the 40-minute “Tarachime (Birth/Mother),” return<strong>s</strong> once again to her great-aunt, thi<strong>s</strong> time in her 90’<strong>s</strong>, <strong>s</strong>uffering from poor health and the beginning<strong>s</strong> of dementia. The film open<strong>s</strong> with the <strong>s</strong>tartling image of her great-aunt’<strong>s</strong> naked...

    An interview with Naomi Kawase, director of “The Mourning Forest”

    Christopher Bourne etails of the natural world, as well as a vivid sense of Nara as a place (you could practically draw a map of Nara based on her films), that she brings so forcefully to her documentaries. Kawases most recent documentary, the 40-minute “Tarachime (Birth/Mother),” returns once again to her great-aunt, this time in her 90’s, suffering from poor health and the beginnings of dementia. The film opens with the startling image of her great-aunt’s naked...

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  • ...<strong>s</strong>t thing about Pat’<strong>s</strong> and Geno’<strong>s</strong>, aside from the long <strong>s</strong>ense of history, i<strong>s</strong> the fact that they are open 24 hour<strong>s</strong> a day. There’<strong>s</strong> a comforting appeal about being able to get cheesesteak<strong>s</strong> any time of day, even at 4 a.m. <strong>S</strong>adly, because of their fame and popularity, they can continue to raise the price<strong>s</strong> without having to commensurately upgrade the quality of their <strong>s</strong>teak<strong>s</strong>. Geno’<strong>s</strong> doe<strong>s</strong>, after all, have to pay their massive electric...

    From the Land of Cheesesteaks, the joints that reign supreme

    Scott Miller ...st thing about Pat’s and Geno’s, aside from the long sense of history, is the fact that they are open 24 hours a day. There’s a comforting appeal about being able to get cheesesteaks any time of day, even at 4 a.m. Sadly, because of their fame and popularity, they can continue to raise the prices without having to commensurately upgrade the quality of their steaks. Geno’s does, after all, have to pay their massive electric...

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  • ...lding off of hi<strong>s</strong> already immense popularity in Asia a<strong>s</strong> a model.   Also unlike <strong>S</strong>am, Henney immediately <strong>s</strong>aw hi<strong>s</strong> career grow exponentially after <strong>s</strong>ettling into hi<strong>s s</strong>econd home and <strong>s</strong>hooting the Korean drama “My Lovely <strong>S</strong>am-<strong>s</strong>oon” in 2005.  <strong>S</strong>even year<strong>s</strong> later, he ha<strong>s</strong> learned Korean and now juggle<strong>s</strong> project<strong>s</strong> acros<strong>s</strong> the globe, ranging from “X-Men Origin<strong>s</strong>: Wolverine” to Kim Jee-woon’<strong>s</strong> upcoming American debut “The Last <strong>S</strong>tand.” Before the New York premiere of “...

    An interview with Daniel Henney: Comedy, career and Korea

    Yuan-Kwan Chan ...lding off of his already immense popularity in Asia as a model.   Also unlike Sam, Henney immediately saw his career grow exponentially after settling into his second home and shooting the Korean drama “My Lovely Sam-soon” in 2005.  Seven years later, he has learned Korean and now juggles projects across the globe, ranging from “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” to Kim Jee-woon’s upcoming American debut “The Last Stand.” Before the New York premiere of “...

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  • awase’<strong>s</strong> childhood home, and the <strong>s</strong>etting of all her film<strong>s</strong>. One of the people living at the home i<strong>s S</strong>higeki (<strong>S</strong>higeki Uda), a man <strong>s</strong>eemingly <strong>s</strong>uffering from Alzheimer’<strong>s</strong> and <strong>s</strong>till grieving for Mako, hi<strong>s</strong> deceased wife, who passed on 33 year<strong>s</strong> before. Thi<strong>s</strong> i<strong>s</strong> a <strong>s</strong>ignificant anniversary; a<strong>s</strong> the Buddhist priest explain<strong>s</strong>, in the 33rd year, a deceased person make<strong>s</strong> their final transformation into a Buddha. <strong>S</strong>higeki i<strong>s</strong> drawn to Machiko, mostly because of the <strong>s</strong>imi...

    Review: Naomi Kawase’s “The Mourning Forest”

    Christopher Bourne awase’s childhood home, and the setting of all her films. One of the people living at the home is Shigeki (Shigeki Uda), a man seemingly suffering from Alzheimer’s and still grieving for Mako, his deceased wife, who passed on 33 years before. This is a significant anniversary; as the Buddhist priest explains, in the 33rd year, a deceased person makes their final transformation into a Buddha. Shigeki is drawn to Machiko, mostly because of the simi...

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  • The lively, joyou<strong>s</strong> music of Japanese <strong>s</strong>alsa <strong>s</strong>inger Yoko affirm<strong>s</strong> the power of music to transcend national and ethnic boundarie<strong>s</strong>. On October 24, 2008, Yoko and her band performed a rousing <strong>s</strong>how at New York’<strong>s S</strong>.O.B.’<strong>s</strong>, to launch the release of her CD, “La Japonesa <strong>S</strong>alsera.” Hailing from Osaka, Japan, Yoko ha<strong>s</strong> been performing music from a very young age, beginning when <strong>s</strong>he fronted a local rock band in Osaka. While <strong>s</strong>tudying at the Kyoto University of...

    Interview with Japanese salsa singer Yoko and producer Willie Ruiz

    Christopher Bourne The lively, joyous music of Japanese salsa singer Yoko affirms the power of music to transcend national and ethnic boundaries. On October 24, 2008, Yoko and her band performed a rousing show at New York’s S.O.B.’s, to launch the release of her CD, “La Japonesa Salsera.” Hailing from Osaka, Japan, Yoko has been performing music from a very young age, beginning when she fronted a local rock band in Osaka. While studying at the Kyoto University of...

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  • tistic uncle.  High drama i<strong>s</strong> impressively rendered without resorting to overwrought kitchen-<strong>s</strong>ink melodrama. 2010 PIFF award<strong>s</strong>/<strong>s</strong>tatistic<strong>s</strong> Number of film<strong>s s</strong>creened:  306 film<strong>s</strong> from 67 countrie<strong>s</strong>, including 101 world premiere<strong>s</strong> and 52 international premiere<strong>s</strong> Total audience attendance: 173,516 Accredited journalist attendance: 2,237 New Current<strong>s</strong> Award (for best first or <strong>s</strong>econd film): “The Journal<strong>s</strong> of Musan” (Park Jung-bum, <strong>S</strong>outh Korea) “Bleak Night” (Yo...

    The best films of the 2010 Pusan International Film Festival

    Christopher Bourne tistic uncle.  High drama is impressively rendered without resorting to overwrought kitchen-sink melodrama. 2010 PIFF awards/statistics Number of films screened: 306 films from 67 countries, including 101 world premieres and 52 international premieres Total audience attendance: 173,516 Accredited journalist attendance: 2,237 New Currents Award (for best first or second film): “The Journals of Musan” (Park Jung-bum, South Korea) “Bleak Night” (Yo...

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  • Dustin Nguyen took on the lead role of Dao in hi<strong>s</strong> directorial debut, “Once Upon a Time in Vietnam.” (photo courtesy of the Busan International Film Festival)   In a mockumentary capturing the Bruce Lee post-death frenzy of cashing in on the <strong>s</strong>uddenly popular martial art<strong>s</strong> genre – the 2007 Justin Lin film “Finishing the Game” – the actor Dustin Nguyen play<strong>s</strong> the actor Troy Poon, who just want<strong>s</strong> a role that require<strong>s</strong> more work than poi...

    A Dustin Nguyen interview: Transforming Vietnamese film

    Yuan-Kwan Chan Dustin Nguyen took on the lead role of Dao in his directorial debut, “Once Upon a Time in Vietnam.” (photo courtesy of the Busan International Film Festival)   In a mockumentary capturing the Bruce Lee post-death frenzy of cashing in on the suddenly popular martial arts genre – the 2007 Justin Lin film “Finishing the Game” – the actor Dustin Nguyen plays the actor Troy Poon, who just wants a role that requires more work than poi...

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  • er<strong>s</strong>. The inevitable push toward<strong>s</strong> the digitization of film i<strong>s</strong> why Panh, winner of the Asian Filmmaker of the Year Award at the 2013 Busan International Film Festival, consider<strong>s</strong> the future a<strong>s</strong> equally important a<strong>s</strong> the past.  The 49-year-old director co-founded the Bophana Audiovisual Resource Center in Phnom Penh where <strong>s</strong>tudent<strong>s</strong> – unable to benefit from the lost generation of artist<strong>s</strong> that perished during the Khmer Rouge era – learn about archiving, p...

    A Rithy Panh interview: “The Missing Picture” and Cambodian cinema

    Yuan-Kwan Chan ers. The inevitable push towards the digitization of film is why Panh, winner of the Asian Filmmaker of the Year Award at the 2013 Busan International Film Festival, considers the future as equally important as the past.  The 49-year-old director co-founded the Bophana Audiovisual Resource Center in Phnom Penh where students – unable to benefit from the lost generation of artists that perished during the Khmer Rouge era – learn about archiving, p...

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  • ...ector. Meniscu<strong>s</strong>: Were there any formative film experience<strong>s</strong> that you had when you were young that <strong>s</strong>tood out for you? Not really. I think I came into filmmaking really late. I didn’t touch my first film camera until I wa<strong>s</strong> 23, when I wa<strong>s</strong> in film <strong>s</strong>chool. You <strong>s</strong>tudied psychology in <strong>s</strong>chool. Ha<strong>s</strong> that been helpful to you a<strong>s</strong> a filmmaker? Yeah, just understanding the human condition and human behavior, and just dealing with negotiating thing<strong>s</strong> on <strong>s</strong>et w...

    Interview with “Eve and the Fire Horse” Director Julia Kwan

    Christopher Bourne ...ector. Meniscus: Were there any formative film experiences that you had when you were young that stood out for you? Not really. I think I came into filmmaking really late. I didn’t touch my first film camera until I was 23, when I was in film school. You studied psychology in school. Has that been helpful to you as a filmmaker? Yeah, just understanding the human condition and human behavior, and just dealing with negotiating things on set w...

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  • One major element of Tsai Ming-liang’<strong>s</strong> film<strong>s</strong>, remarked on by many commentator<strong>s</strong>, i<strong>s</strong> water; Tsai’<strong>s</strong> film<strong>s</strong> are practically drenched with it. Water, in all it<strong>s</strong> form<strong>s</strong>, course<strong>s</strong> through the films; in rainstorm<strong>s</strong>, bottled water, toilet<strong>s</strong>, flooding, bathtub<strong>s</strong>, and tear<strong>s</strong>. It i<strong>s</strong> omnipresent, yet mysteriou<strong>s</strong> and often menacing. It doesn’t give up it<strong>s s</strong>ecret<strong>s</strong> easily, or at all. In thi<strong>s</strong> way, the water in Tsai’<strong>s</strong> film<strong>s</strong> i<strong>s</strong> very much like the character<strong>s</strong> in them, who d...

    Review: Tsai Ming-liang’s “Rebels of the Neon God”

    Christopher Bourne One major element of Tsai Ming-liang’s films, remarked on by many commentators, is water; Tsai’s films are practically drenched with it. Water, in all its forms, courses through the films; in rainstorms, bottled water, toilets, flooding, bathtubs, and tears. It is omnipresent, yet mysterious and often menacing. It doesn’t give up its secrets easily, or at all. In this way, the water in Tsai’s films is very much like the characters in them, who d...

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